Pakalimu

Taiwanese Aborigines' Millet Wine

Taiwanese aborigines are facing the same situation as Native Americans in USA. Their land and rights were taken from them long time ago and they are raising their voice to fight back now. I was thinking, how can I use design to raise awareness? Non-profit organizations often time can only reach certain people who already care about the topic. What about designing for a product? Plus, who does not like a little alcohol involved ;-) People can be attracted to the wine itself or the design first, then become curious about the story and the cause behind it. This way, it opens up opportunities to reach out to audiences who wouldn’t be connected otherwise.

Website: rit.edu
Date: March 2016
Services: Identity / Motion / Website

00. Logotype

The diamond shape symbolizes the eyes of Atayal’s ancestral spirits protecting the Atayal.

The logotype came from the geometric patterns that appear in many tribes’ clothing. The diamond shape symbolizes the eyes of Atayal’s ancestral spirits protecting the Atayal throughout their whole life. The stylized A represents the mountains most aboriginals live in. The tag line is made entirely with diamond shapes which also resembles the traditional Atayal weaving patterns.

01. Atayal

The Atayal is one tribe of Taiwanese aborigines. The meaning of Atayal is “genuine person” or “brave person”. The Atayal people are known as great warriors.

The Atayal people are good weavers as well. Symbolic patterns and design, mainly geometric, can be found on Atayal traditional dresses. Black, red, and white are the main colors. Most of the designs are argyles and horizontal lines. In Atayal Culture, the horizontal lines represent the rainbow bridge which leads the dead to where the ancestors’ spirits live. Argyles, on the other hand, represent ancestors’ eyes protecting the Atayal.

The tattoo costume was banned in the 1880s and only three Atayals are still alive with facial tattoos. Traditional, a girl would learn to weave when she was between ten to twelve, and she had to master the skill in order to earn her tattoo. Only those with tattoos could marry and after death, only those with tattoos could cross the Hongu Utux, the spirit bridge, to the thereafter.

Once a male had came of age he would have his forehead tattooed. As soon as he fathered a child, his bottom chin was tattooed. For the female, tattooing was done on the cheek typically from the ears across both cheeks to the lips forming a V-shape. A female tattoo would take up to ten hours to make.

 

Photo credit: taipics.com/
paka_pattern_730px

Pattern

This pattern is derived from traditional Atayal clothing. The horizontal lines represent the rainbow bridge which leads the dead to where the ancestors’ spirits live. Argyles, on the other hand, represent ancestors’ eyes protecting the Atayal.

The traditional Atayal pattern on a dark background is used as the paper wrapper for packaging and is introduced with a motion piece.

02. Millet Wine

Millet wine is the oldest wine in Taiwan and a traditional beverage of Taiwanese aborigines.

It is often used in Harvest Festivals, as a signal of harvest, as well as at any important milestone in someone’s life, such as the birth of a new baby and weddings. Millet wine is a cultural symbol, a key part of aboriginal rituals. Traditional, people drink millet wine in a circle as an offering to one’s ancestors and to ward off evil spirits. Consuming it brings good fortune to the community.

Millet wine tastes like Japanese sake but warmer, sweeter, and stickier.


BOX & PAPER WRAPPER DISPLAY

THE DELUXE EDITION

THE REGULAR EDITION

03. Design Document

04. Applications

05. Website

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Pakalimu

Taiwanese aborigines are facing the same situation as Native Americans in USA. Their land and rights were taken from them long time ago and they are raising their voice to fight back now. I was thinking, how can I use design to raise awareness? Non-profit organizations often time can only reach certain people who already care about the topic. What about designing for a product? Plus, who does not like a little alcohol involved ;-) People can be attracted to the wine itself or the design first, then become curious about the story and the cause behind it. This way, it opens up opportunities to reach out to audiences who wouldn’t be connected otherwise.

Website: rit.edu
Date: March 2016
Services: Identity / Motion / Website

Multigon

This is a project I made out of paper for a 3D Design class. I adore the sim­plic­ity of geo­met­ric sculp­tures. The ele­gant lines and clean shapes com­bine to form a del­i­cate sophistication. The process of mak­ing this sculp­ture was a bit con­fus­ing since there were many dif­fer­ent ways of con­nect­ing each side. Even after mark­ing every­thing, there is still a great chance that things can go wrong. Details as small as tap­ing one side to the right or left, on top or at the bot­tom could change the whole plan.

I used two tex­tures in this project. One of them was to cut the paper with a dull knife from inside to cre­ate a rip­ping effect. The other was to tape tis­sues to the sur­face and then tear them off so that only a few thin lay­ers remain on the sculpture.

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